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Here are the resources we found for self harm for parents and families:

Dr. Pooky Knightsmith: “Four Practical Strategies to Improve the Mental Well-being of Young People”

(Featured resource)Dr. Pooky Knightsmith’s keynote presentation from the HeadStart Wolverhampton Conference on Oct 3rd explores practical ideas, strategies and approaches for professionals and parents / family members to use when dealing with young people who are facing mental health challenges.

What Not to do if a Child is Self Harming

Dr Pooky Knightsmith provides advice and ideas for concerned parents, teachers or other adults who want to know what they should and should not say and do if a child or young person discloses that they have been self-harming.

Understanding and Breaking the Self Harm Cycle

In this video, Dr Pooky Knightsmith explores why it can be difficult for people to stop self harming due to the self harm cycle. She looks at practical ways of breaking the cycle and the importance of trying to do so as early as possible, whilst remembering that it is never too late to start.

Self Harm: Should Injuries and Scars be Hidden

In this video, Dr Pooky Knightsmith talks about whether injuries and scars should be hidden. She suggests that while an injury is still healing, they should be covered to avoid infection. When these injuries become scars you should treat them like any other scar and dress for the weather, having scars showing if you feel comfortable.

Organisation View all organisations

The Youth Wellbeing Directory from the Anna Freud Centre

(Featured resource)The Youth Wellbeing Directory is an online directory of organisations that support young people with a wide range of mental health and wellbeing issues. You can search by postcode or keywords, and quickly find the details of local organisations and services that can support the needs of young people and families.

MIND, the Mental Health Charity

(Featured resource)Every year, one in four of us will experience a mental health problem but hundreds of thousands of people are still struggling. MIND believe no-one should have to face a mental health problem alone. They will listen, give you support and advice, and fight your corner.

Young Minds

(Featured resource)Young Minds is a leading UK charity focusing on mental health and wellbeing in young people. They provide comprehensive help and advice on a variety of topics including what mental health is, feelings and symptoms, conditions, how to look after yourself and so much more.

Rethink Mental Illness

Rethink Mental Illness is a charity that believes a better life is possible for the millions of people affected by mental illness. They offer a variety of services including; support groups, carer support, crisis intervention, nursing and residential care, advice and helplines, community support, employment and training, personalisation, mental health training, advocacy, help with criminal justice and house, and talking treatments.

Self-Harm

(Featured resource)This webpage is for parents and carers who may be worried about self-harm in their teenage child. The site includes a four step guide to support parents, and a PDF guide called “Talking to your teenager about self-harm”.

The Youth Wellbeing Directory from the Anna Freud Centre

(Featured resource)The Youth Wellbeing Directory is an online directory of organisations that support young people with a wide range of mental health and wellbeing issues. You can search by postcode or keywords, and quickly find the details of local organisations and services that can support the needs of young people and families.

The ’13 Reasons Why’ Toolkit

’13 Reasons Why’, is a hit Netflix show that focusses on the fictional suicide of a teenage girl in an American High School, and the causes and circumstances that surrounded that, including bullying and sexual violence. For Series Two of the show, Netflix commissioned a toolkit of resources and advice for parents, educators and young people.

Self Harm

“If you think your son or daughter might be self-harming it can be really frightening. Research estimates that about one in 10 teenagers has self-harmed, but because it’s a secret activity it can be difficult to confront.”

This is a free resource available through the Relate website. The information given is clear and concise, and the language used is easy to understand, so it should be accessible be everyone. This resource gives information to parents/family in regards to self-harm, broken down into 3 sections, the first section introduces the reader to what self-harm is, and the second section looks at what the parent/family can do in order to support. The third section suggests that the best course of treatment for those who self-harm is counselling. There are also links to further help which is available through Relate such as family counselling.

The ’13 Reasons Why’ Toolkit

’13 Reasons Why’, is a hit Netflix show that focusses on the fictional suicide of a teenage girl in an American High School, and the causes and circumstances that surrounded that, including bullying and sexual violence. For Series Two of the show, Netflix commissioned a toolkit of resources and advice for parents, educators and young people.

Coping With Self Harm – A Guide for Parents

This guide was developed from talking to parents and carers of young people and is aimed at helping parents, carers, other family members and friends cope when a young person is self-harming.

Self Harm – Family and Friends

This leaflet from Harmless aims to provide support for friends and family members of a young person, or any person, who self harms. It provides information on what self harm is, why people self harm, what causes people to self harm, and how to help someone who self harms.

Self Harm Factsheet: Friends and Family

This is a pretty short 5 page fact sheet which aims to provide useful information to the family and friends of someone that does self harm.

Audio

Child in Mind: Why do some people Self-Harm?

Self-harming behaviour is becoming more common according to recent statistics, and particularly among young people between 16 and 25 years, but what is self-harming behaviour, why do people do it and what help is available for those affected?

Blog / personal article

What Not to Say if a Child is Self-Harming

In this blog post, Pooky Knightsmith shares a few points on what not to say to a child who is showing self harm behaviours, as well of some advice on how to have a positive conversation about self harm. The advice in this blog post is all suggested by young people and provides helpful pointers for friends, teachers or parents.

News article

Young Men are Hidden Self-Harmers

When it comes to information on self-harm, young men are often overlooked. A YouGov Survey commissioned by three leading youth charities found an alarming number of men were self-harming or had considered it. The Mix writes up the findings from this report and discusses how we can help young men when they are not okay.

Dr. Pooky Knightsmith: “Four Practical Strategies to Improve the Mental Well-being of Young People”

(Featured resource)Dr. Pooky Knightsmith’s keynote presentation from the HeadStart Wolverhampton Conference on Oct 3rd explores practical ideas, strategies and approaches for professionals and parents / family members to use when dealing with young people who are facing mental health challenges.

What Not to do if a Child is Self Harming

Dr Pooky Knightsmith provides advice and ideas for concerned parents, teachers or other adults who want to know what they should and should not say and do if a child or young person discloses that they have been self-harming.

Understanding and Breaking the Self Harm Cycle

In this video, Dr Pooky Knightsmith explores why it can be difficult for people to stop self harming due to the self harm cycle. She looks at practical ways of breaking the cycle and the importance of trying to do so as early as possible, whilst remembering that it is never too late to start.

Organisation View all organisations

The Youth Wellbeing Directory from the Anna Freud Centre

(Featured resource)The Youth Wellbeing Directory is an online directory of organisations that support young people with a wide range of mental health and wellbeing issues. You can search by postcode or keywords, and quickly find the details of local organisations and services that can support the needs of young people and families.

MIND, the Mental Health Charity

(Featured resource)Every year, one in four of us will experience a mental health problem but hundreds of thousands of people are still struggling. MIND believe no-one should have to face a mental health problem alone. They will listen, give you support and advice, and fight your corner.

Young Minds

(Featured resource)Young Minds is a leading UK charity focusing on mental health and wellbeing in young people. They provide comprehensive help and advice on a variety of topics including what mental health is, feelings and symptoms, conditions, how to look after yourself and so much more.

Self-Harm

(Featured resource)This webpage is for parents and carers who may be worried about self-harm in their teenage child. The site includes a four step guide to support parents, and a PDF guide called “Talking to your teenager about self-harm”.

The Youth Wellbeing Directory from the Anna Freud Centre

(Featured resource)The Youth Wellbeing Directory is an online directory of organisations that support young people with a wide range of mental health and wellbeing issues. You can search by postcode or keywords, and quickly find the details of local organisations and services that can support the needs of young people and families.

The ’13 Reasons Why’ Toolkit

’13 Reasons Why’, is a hit Netflix show that focusses on the fictional suicide of a teenage girl in an American High School, and the causes and circumstances that surrounded that, including bullying and sexual violence. For Series Two of the show, Netflix commissioned a toolkit of resources and advice for parents, educators and young people.

The ’13 Reasons Why’ Toolkit

’13 Reasons Why’, is a hit Netflix show that focusses on the fictional suicide of a teenage girl in an American High School, and the causes and circumstances that surrounded that, including bullying and sexual violence. For Series Two of the show, Netflix commissioned a toolkit of resources and advice for parents, educators and young people.

Coping With Self Harm – A Guide for Parents

This guide was developed from talking to parents and carers of young people and is aimed at helping parents, carers, other family members and friends cope when a young person is self-harming.

Self Harm – Family and Friends

This leaflet from Harmless aims to provide support for friends and family members of a young person, or any person, who self harms. It provides information on what self harm is, why people self harm, what causes people to self harm, and how to help someone who self harms.

Audio

Child in Mind: Why do some people Self-Harm?

Self-harming behaviour is becoming more common according to recent statistics, and particularly among young people between 16 and 25 years, but what is self-harming behaviour, why do people do it and what help is available for those affected?

Blog / personal article

What Not to Say if a Child is Self-Harming

In this blog post, Pooky Knightsmith shares a few points on what not to say to a child who is showing self harm behaviours, as well of some advice on how to have a positive conversation about self harm. The advice in this blog post is all suggested by young people and provides helpful pointers for friends, teachers or parents.

News article

Young Men are Hidden Self-Harmers

When it comes to information on self-harm, young men are often overlooked. A YouGov Survey commissioned by three leading youth charities found an alarming number of men were self-harming or had considered it. The Mix writes up the findings from this report and discusses how we can help young men when they are not okay.

Dr. Pooky Knightsmith: “Four Practical Strategies to Improve the Mental Well-being of Young People”

(Featured resource)Dr. Pooky Knightsmith’s keynote presentation from the HeadStart Wolverhampton Conference on Oct 3rd explores practical ideas, strategies and approaches for professionals and parents / family members to use when dealing with young people who are facing mental health challenges.

What Not to do if a Child is Self Harming

Dr Pooky Knightsmith provides advice and ideas for concerned parents, teachers or other adults who want to know what they should and should not say and do if a child or young person discloses that they have been self-harming.

Understanding and Breaking the Self Harm Cycle

In this video, Dr Pooky Knightsmith explores why it can be difficult for people to stop self harming due to the self harm cycle. She looks at practical ways of breaking the cycle and the importance of trying to do so as early as possible, whilst remembering that it is never too late to start.

Organisation View all organisations

The Youth Wellbeing Directory from the Anna Freud Centre

(Featured resource)The Youth Wellbeing Directory is an online directory of organisations that support young people with a wide range of mental health and wellbeing issues. You can search by postcode or keywords, and quickly find the details of local organisations and services that can support the needs of young people and families.

MIND, the Mental Health Charity

(Featured resource)Every year, one in four of us will experience a mental health problem but hundreds of thousands of people are still struggling. MIND believe no-one should have to face a mental health problem alone. They will listen, give you support and advice, and fight your corner.

Young Minds

(Featured resource)Young Minds is a leading UK charity focusing on mental health and wellbeing in young people. They provide comprehensive help and advice on a variety of topics including what mental health is, feelings and symptoms, conditions, how to look after yourself and so much more.

Audio

Child in Mind: Why do some people Self-Harm?

Self-harming behaviour is becoming more common according to recent statistics, and particularly among young people between 16 and 25 years, but what is self-harming behaviour, why do people do it and what help is available for those affected?

Self-Harm

(Featured resource)This webpage is for parents and carers who may be worried about self-harm in their teenage child. The site includes a four step guide to support parents, and a PDF guide called “Talking to your teenager about self-harm”.

The Youth Wellbeing Directory from the Anna Freud Centre

(Featured resource)The Youth Wellbeing Directory is an online directory of organisations that support young people with a wide range of mental health and wellbeing issues. You can search by postcode or keywords, and quickly find the details of local organisations and services that can support the needs of young people and families.

The ’13 Reasons Why’ Toolkit

’13 Reasons Why’, is a hit Netflix show that focusses on the fictional suicide of a teenage girl in an American High School, and the causes and circumstances that surrounded that, including bullying and sexual violence. For Series Two of the show, Netflix commissioned a toolkit of resources and advice for parents, educators and young people.

The ’13 Reasons Why’ Toolkit

’13 Reasons Why’, is a hit Netflix show that focusses on the fictional suicide of a teenage girl in an American High School, and the causes and circumstances that surrounded that, including bullying and sexual violence. For Series Two of the show, Netflix commissioned a toolkit of resources and advice for parents, educators and young people.

Coping With Self Harm – A Guide for Parents

This guide was developed from talking to parents and carers of young people and is aimed at helping parents, carers, other family members and friends cope when a young person is self-harming.

Self Harm – Family and Friends

This leaflet from Harmless aims to provide support for friends and family members of a young person, or any person, who self harms. It provides information on what self harm is, why people self harm, what causes people to self harm, and how to help someone who self harms.

Blog / personal article

What Not to Say if a Child is Self-Harming

In this blog post, Pooky Knightsmith shares a few points on what not to say to a child who is showing self harm behaviours, as well of some advice on how to have a positive conversation about self harm. The advice in this blog post is all suggested by young people and provides helpful pointers for friends, teachers or parents.

News article

Young Men are Hidden Self-Harmers

When it comes to information on self-harm, young men are often overlooked. A YouGov Survey commissioned by three leading youth charities found an alarming number of men were self-harming or had considered it. The Mix writes up the findings from this report and discusses how we can help young men when they are not okay.