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Here are the resources we found for obsessive compulsive disorder for professionals:

Video

OCD and Depression – Annabel’s story – When I Worry about Things

(Featured resource)Suitable for teaching 8 to 13s. A powerful animated film about a girl who developed nervous tics, OCD and depression after a period of upheaval, and how she learnt to cope.

WARNING: Contains some scenes which some viewers may find upsetting.

Living with #OCD – Samantha Pena

Have you ever done something and thought to yourself, ‘that’s so OCD?’. In this riveting talk, Samantha Pena delves into what it’s really like to live with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and that advantages it brings to her life.

Debunking the Myths of OCD

There’s a common misconception that if you like to meticulously organise your things, keep your hands clean, or plan out your weekend to the last detail, you might have OCD. In fact, OCD is a serious psychiatric condition that is frequently misunderstood by society and mental health professionals. In this video, Natascha M. Santos debunks the myths surrounding OCD.

Webpage

Teachers Guide to OCD in the Classroom

This guide for teachers covers OCD in the classroom. It covers a number of different topics including; obsessions that might be common in young people in OCD, behaviours you might see in students with OCD, behaviours that are often confused with another disorder, how to help students with OCD, how to minimise behavioural problems and finally how to involve peers.

How Teachers can Help Kids with OCD

If a child is suffering with OCD in your classroom, they may be distracted, frustrated in completing their work, or even disruptive to other student. There are some things you, as a teacher, can do to help them focus on learning. This webpage from the Child Mind Institute contains top tips and advice for teachers who may have a student with OCD in their class.

Understanding & Identifying OCD in the Classroom

Children say and do unusual things on occasion, or even quite often, but how do we know that it isn’t just a quirky behaviour or something more serious? How do we know if a child is struggling? If you are a teacher, how would you know that those unusual behaviours you observe in your student may be something more, something that needs to be explored and possibly addressed. This article from Resources to Recovery aims to help you understand OCD in the classroom.

Obsessive Compulsive Behaviour

Children with obsessive compulsive behaviour, more commonly known as obsessive-compulsive disorder, have repeating thoughts, images or feelings that are distressing. They also carry out rituals  or habits to temporarily feel better. OCD is a type of anxiety disorder. Sometimes these behaviours can become a coping mechanism to manage other stressful life events.

 

Organisation

Young Minds

(Featured resource)Young Minds is a leading UK charity focusing on mental health and wellbeing in young people. They provide comprehensive help and advice on a variety of topics including what mental health is, feelings and symptoms, conditions, how to look after yourself and so much more.

Download

Getting to know your OCD better: OCD Monitoring Form

Learning to gradually face your fears is one of the most effective ways to break the OCD cycle. It may be helpful to get to know what you are thinking and identify the triggers that bring on your obsessions and compulsions. You can keep track of the triggers you experience using this downloadable OCD monitoring form.

Video

OCD and Depression – Annabel’s story – When I Worry about Things

(Featured resource)Suitable for teaching 8 to 13s. A powerful animated film about a girl who developed nervous tics, OCD and depression after a period of upheaval, and how she learnt to cope.

WARNING: Contains some scenes which some viewers may find upsetting.

Living with #OCD – Samantha Pena

Have you ever done something and thought to yourself, ‘that’s so OCD?’. In this riveting talk, Samantha Pena delves into what it’s really like to live with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and that advantages it brings to her life.

Debunking the Myths of OCD

There’s a common misconception that if you like to meticulously organise your things, keep your hands clean, or plan out your weekend to the last detail, you might have OCD. In fact, OCD is a serious psychiatric condition that is frequently misunderstood by society and mental health professionals. In this video, Natascha M. Santos debunks the myths surrounding OCD.

Teachers Guide to OCD in the Classroom

This guide for teachers covers OCD in the classroom. It covers a number of different topics including; obsessions that might be common in young people in OCD, behaviours you might see in students with OCD, behaviours that are often confused with another disorder, how to help students with OCD, how to minimise behavioural problems and finally how to involve peers.

How Teachers can Help Kids with OCD

If a child is suffering with OCD in your classroom, they may be distracted, frustrated in completing their work, or even disruptive to other student. There are some things you, as a teacher, can do to help them focus on learning. This webpage from the Child Mind Institute contains top tips and advice for teachers who may have a student with OCD in their class.

Understanding & Identifying OCD in the Classroom

Children say and do unusual things on occasion, or even quite often, but how do we know that it isn’t just a quirky behaviour or something more serious? How do we know if a child is struggling? If you are a teacher, how would you know that those unusual behaviours you observe in your student may be something more, something that needs to be explored and possibly addressed. This article from Resources to Recovery aims to help you understand OCD in the classroom.

Organisation

Young Minds

(Featured resource)Young Minds is a leading UK charity focusing on mental health and wellbeing in young people. They provide comprehensive help and advice on a variety of topics including what mental health is, feelings and symptoms, conditions, how to look after yourself and so much more.

Download

Getting to know your OCD better: OCD Monitoring Form

Learning to gradually face your fears is one of the most effective ways to break the OCD cycle. It may be helpful to get to know what you are thinking and identify the triggers that bring on your obsessions and compulsions. You can keep track of the triggers you experience using this downloadable OCD monitoring form.

Video

OCD and Depression – Annabel’s story – When I Worry about Things

(Featured resource)Suitable for teaching 8 to 13s. A powerful animated film about a girl who developed nervous tics, OCD and depression after a period of upheaval, and how she learnt to cope.

WARNING: Contains some scenes which some viewers may find upsetting.

Living with #OCD – Samantha Pena

Have you ever done something and thought to yourself, ‘that’s so OCD?’. In this riveting talk, Samantha Pena delves into what it’s really like to live with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder and that advantages it brings to her life.

Debunking the Myths of OCD

There’s a common misconception that if you like to meticulously organise your things, keep your hands clean, or plan out your weekend to the last detail, you might have OCD. In fact, OCD is a serious psychiatric condition that is frequently misunderstood by society and mental health professionals. In this video, Natascha M. Santos debunks the myths surrounding OCD.

Organisation

Young Minds

(Featured resource)Young Minds is a leading UK charity focusing on mental health and wellbeing in young people. They provide comprehensive help and advice on a variety of topics including what mental health is, feelings and symptoms, conditions, how to look after yourself and so much more.

Teachers Guide to OCD in the Classroom

This guide for teachers covers OCD in the classroom. It covers a number of different topics including; obsessions that might be common in young people in OCD, behaviours you might see in students with OCD, behaviours that are often confused with another disorder, how to help students with OCD, how to minimise behavioural problems and finally how to involve peers.

How Teachers can Help Kids with OCD

If a child is suffering with OCD in your classroom, they may be distracted, frustrated in completing their work, or even disruptive to other student. There are some things you, as a teacher, can do to help them focus on learning. This webpage from the Child Mind Institute contains top tips and advice for teachers who may have a student with OCD in their class.

Understanding & Identifying OCD in the Classroom

Children say and do unusual things on occasion, or even quite often, but how do we know that it isn’t just a quirky behaviour or something more serious? How do we know if a child is struggling? If you are a teacher, how would you know that those unusual behaviours you observe in your student may be something more, something that needs to be explored and possibly addressed. This article from Resources to Recovery aims to help you understand OCD in the classroom.

Download

Getting to know your OCD better: OCD Monitoring Form

Learning to gradually face your fears is one of the most effective ways to break the OCD cycle. It may be helpful to get to know what you are thinking and identify the triggers that bring on your obsessions and compulsions. You can keep track of the triggers you experience using this downloadable OCD monitoring form.