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Here are the resources we found for disability for parents and families:

Organisation View all organisations

YoungSibs

YoungSibs is for children and young people who have a brother or sister who is disabled, has special educational needs or a serious long-term condition. YoungSibs is aimed at young people in the UK aged between 6 and 17.

Scope

Scope is a charity that exists to make this country a place where disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else. Until then, Scope will be here. Scope provide support, information and advice for people who are disabled or love someone with a disability.

Family Fund

Family Fund is the UK’s largest charity providing grants for families raising disabled or seriously ill children and young people. Beginning with the most vulnerable, those on low incomes, and considering all conditions against their disability criteria, Family Fund aim to make a difference to outcomes for disabled or seriously ill children and young people and the lives of the families raising them across the UK.

Carers Trust

Carers Trust is a major charity for, with and about carers. Here you will find advice on money and benefits, legal matters, health and wellbeing, how to go about getting a carers assessment and carers breaks.

Webpage

Advice If Your Disabled Child is Bullied

Children are more likely to be bullied if they are vulnerable in some way. Disabled children and children with additional needs are more likely to be bullied than their peers. People’s assumptions and prejudices about disability can make disabled children more vulnerable to bullying for a number of reasons. However, not all disabled children are bullied so try not to worry. This webpage gives details of how to be prepared in case it bullying does happen.

Disability and Growing Up

Puberty can be an awkward time for any family, but for disabled young people it can be especially confusing. Many of the challenges of growing up are universal – figuring out how to talk to a child about sex and relationships without too much embarrassment, for example – but young people with disabilities and their families also face some specific challenges.

Video

Talk to Me

Having a physical disability doesn’t mean that you can’t talk to me. That’s Phoebe’s message. She wants people to know that just because she is disabled, it doesn’t mean that you need to treat her like a baby, just talk to her.

Download

Getting Social Care Services When Your Child has Additional Needs

Local authorities have a legal responsibility to help families with disabled children. Many children have additional needs and disabilities, and some are more severely affected than others. Some disabled children and their parents will need practical support both inside the home and outside it. This guide explains your right to get the support you need from your local authority through departments like social services, sometimes known as ‘children with disabilities teams’ or ‘children’s services’.

Organisation View all organisations

YoungSibs

YoungSibs is for children and young people who have a brother or sister who is disabled, has special educational needs or a serious long-term condition. YoungSibs is aimed at young people in the UK aged between 6 and 17.

Scope

Scope is a charity that exists to make this country a place where disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else. Until then, Scope will be here. Scope provide support, information and advice for people who are disabled or love someone with a disability.

Family Fund

Family Fund is the UK’s largest charity providing grants for families raising disabled or seriously ill children and young people. Beginning with the most vulnerable, those on low incomes, and considering all conditions against their disability criteria, Family Fund aim to make a difference to outcomes for disabled or seriously ill children and young people and the lives of the families raising them across the UK.

Webpage

Advice If Your Disabled Child is Bullied

Children are more likely to be bullied if they are vulnerable in some way. Disabled children and children with additional needs are more likely to be bullied than their peers. People’s assumptions and prejudices about disability can make disabled children more vulnerable to bullying for a number of reasons. However, not all disabled children are bullied so try not to worry. This webpage gives details of how to be prepared in case it bullying does happen.

Disability and Growing Up

Puberty can be an awkward time for any family, but for disabled young people it can be especially confusing. Many of the challenges of growing up are universal – figuring out how to talk to a child about sex and relationships without too much embarrassment, for example – but young people with disabilities and their families also face some specific challenges.

Download

Getting Social Care Services When Your Child has Additional Needs

Local authorities have a legal responsibility to help families with disabled children. Many children have additional needs and disabilities, and some are more severely affected than others. Some disabled children and their parents will need practical support both inside the home and outside it. This guide explains your right to get the support you need from your local authority through departments like social services, sometimes known as ‘children with disabilities teams’ or ‘children’s services’.

Video

Talk to Me

Having a physical disability doesn’t mean that you can’t talk to me. That’s Phoebe’s message. She wants people to know that just because she is disabled, it doesn’t mean that you need to treat her like a baby, just talk to her.

Organisation View all organisations

YoungSibs

YoungSibs is for children and young people who have a brother or sister who is disabled, has special educational needs or a serious long-term condition. YoungSibs is aimed at young people in the UK aged between 6 and 17.

Scope

Scope is a charity that exists to make this country a place where disabled people have the same opportunities as everyone else. Until then, Scope will be here. Scope provide support, information and advice for people who are disabled or love someone with a disability.

Family Fund

Family Fund is the UK’s largest charity providing grants for families raising disabled or seriously ill children and young people. Beginning with the most vulnerable, those on low incomes, and considering all conditions against their disability criteria, Family Fund aim to make a difference to outcomes for disabled or seriously ill children and young people and the lives of the families raising them across the UK.

Webpage

Advice If Your Disabled Child is Bullied

Children are more likely to be bullied if they are vulnerable in some way. Disabled children and children with additional needs are more likely to be bullied than their peers. People’s assumptions and prejudices about disability can make disabled children more vulnerable to bullying for a number of reasons. However, not all disabled children are bullied so try not to worry. This webpage gives details of how to be prepared in case it bullying does happen.

Disability and Growing Up

Puberty can be an awkward time for any family, but for disabled young people it can be especially confusing. Many of the challenges of growing up are universal – figuring out how to talk to a child about sex and relationships without too much embarrassment, for example – but young people with disabilities and their families also face some specific challenges.

Download

Getting Social Care Services When Your Child has Additional Needs

Local authorities have a legal responsibility to help families with disabled children. Many children have additional needs and disabilities, and some are more severely affected than others. Some disabled children and their parents will need practical support both inside the home and outside it. This guide explains your right to get the support you need from your local authority through departments like social services, sometimes known as ‘children with disabilities teams’ or ‘children’s services’.