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Here are the resources we found for abuse for professionals:

Video

Victim Blaming Language

This video showcases real language that professionals have used when talking to victims of child sexual abuse and exploitation. The video highlights that the language used matters when talking to young people who experience these situations. Young people should not be blamed for their experiences, the only person than should be blamed is the perpetrators.

Love and Abuse

This is a free to access resource, created by Jory Kusy, available through YouTube. Everything seemed fine between Olivia and John. Just two teens, boyfriend and girlfriend, but when John begins to become jealous of Olivia’s male friend and study partner, Andrew, things between John and Olivia become physical. John and Olivia share their stories and tell what took place between the two.

Building a Picture of Abuse

After enduring years of abuse at home, one young girl is helping teachers better spot the signs of abuse in others. Abuse can happen to any child, regardless of their background, ethnicity or social class. It is important that teachers pick up on signs of abuse to help put a stop to something that might be happening.

Organisation

The Haven

(Featured resource)The Haven Wolverhampton supports women and their dependent children who are vulnerable to domestic violence, homelessness and abuse. They offer refuge accommodation, financial support, visual evidence for victims and training for professionals. It gives an opportunity for women to cry and express themselves without prejudice.

The National Association for People Abused in Childhood

NAPAC (the National Association for People Abused in Childhood) offers support to adult survivors of all types of childhood abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional abuse or neglect. A freephone helpline is available and the support team can also be contacted by email. Training courses are provided for professionals who support adult survivors of child abuse.

App / online service

The Contextual Safeguarding Audit Toolkit

The Contextual Safeguarding Audit Toolkit supports practitioners to recognise how social environments and extra-familial relationships are relevant to safeguarding adolescents and the extent to which local responses are already contextual in nature. The audit toolkit is divided into five sections; introduction, getting started, collecting evidence, dissemination and application.

Webpage

Abuse

Everyone has the right to feel happy and safe, wherever they are and whoever they are with. However, sometimes people can be hurt by others, leaving them feeling unsafe. If an individual is being hurt by someone, this is called abuse.

This page from the Black Country CAMHS site provides an introduction to abuse, including physical, sexual and emotional abuse. It includes tips to support young people, and a set of additional links.

Child Maltreatment

Child maltreatment is any action causing potentially significant harm to a child. Maltreatment can be initiated by an adult or a child. It can involve physical, sexual, verbal or emotional abuse; neglect or exploitation. This webpage from Mentally Healthy Schools covers the impact of maltreatment on mental health, the effect of maltreatment on development, child abuse and safeguarding, top tips for teachers, recognising sexual abuse, schools and safeguarding duties, spotting the signs of child maltreatment, and what schools can do.

Download

What to do if you’re Worried a Child is being Abused

This publication by the Government gives advice and guidance on how to stop abuse within young people and what to do should concerns arise. It explains in detail the warning signs to look out for and the process that should be followed if you suspect a child is being neglected or abused.

Young Person Safety Plan

This resource is a must have for young people who might be experiencing situations of violence and unrest in their home. This safety plan is to be completed by a young person who may be experiencing abuse, or even after the abuse has stopped. Once completed, the safety plan should be kept in a safe place.

Recovering from Childhood Abuse

This book is written by abuse survivors for all survivors who experienced any form
of abuse or neglect in childhood and for those who provide support. Survivors of any abuse in childhood have the right, and often express their need, to be heard, and for
their experiences to be acknowledged, however long ago the abuse may have happened. NAPAC is an organisation that provides for this, and offers other support and information.

Online course

Child Protection: An Introduction – Online Course

This 3 hour course covers the basics of children’s welfare and how to approach situations where you believe a child may be in a dangerous situation. The topics covered in this course include how to recognise possible child abuse, how to respond appropriately, how to report concerns about a child and how to record what you have seen in reference to a child’s welfare.

Child Protection in Schools – Online Course

This short course takes about three hours to complete and covers topics such as how to recognise possible abuse, how to respond appropriately, how to report any concerns about a young person and how to record your observations. Following each section, there is five short questions to test whether you understood the information. Upon completion of the course, each participants gets a personalised certificate to confirm that they completed the course.

Physical Abuse e-Learning

Physical abuse can have a long-lasting and damaging effect on an individual, but children are very rarely abuse by strangers. In fact, abusers are more likely to be someone who comes into close, regular contact. Abusers can be teachers, next-door neighbours or a member of the family and this can make it harder for children to want to disclose.

Video

Victim Blaming Language

This video showcases real language that professionals have used when talking to victims of child sexual abuse and exploitation. The video highlights that the language used matters when talking to young people who experience these situations. Young people should not be blamed for their experiences, the only person than should be blamed is the perpetrators.

Love and Abuse

This is a free to access resource, created by Jory Kusy, available through YouTube. Everything seemed fine between Olivia and John. Just two teens, boyfriend and girlfriend, but when John begins to become jealous of Olivia’s male friend and study partner, Andrew, things between John and Olivia become physical. John and Olivia share their stories and tell what took place between the two.

Building a Picture of Abuse

After enduring years of abuse at home, one young girl is helping teachers better spot the signs of abuse in others. Abuse can happen to any child, regardless of their background, ethnicity or social class. It is important that teachers pick up on signs of abuse to help put a stop to something that might be happening.

Organisation

The Haven

(Featured resource)The Haven Wolverhampton supports women and their dependent children who are vulnerable to domestic violence, homelessness and abuse. They offer refuge accommodation, financial support, visual evidence for victims and training for professionals. It gives an opportunity for women to cry and express themselves without prejudice.

The National Association for People Abused in Childhood

NAPAC (the National Association for People Abused in Childhood) offers support to adult survivors of all types of childhood abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional abuse or neglect. A freephone helpline is available and the support team can also be contacted by email. Training courses are provided for professionals who support adult survivors of child abuse.

Webpage

Abuse

Everyone has the right to feel happy and safe, wherever they are and whoever they are with. However, sometimes people can be hurt by others, leaving them feeling unsafe. If an individual is being hurt by someone, this is called abuse.

This page from the Black Country CAMHS site provides an introduction to abuse, including physical, sexual and emotional abuse. It includes tips to support young people, and a set of additional links.

Child Maltreatment

Child maltreatment is any action causing potentially significant harm to a child. Maltreatment can be initiated by an adult or a child. It can involve physical, sexual, verbal or emotional abuse; neglect or exploitation. This webpage from Mentally Healthy Schools covers the impact of maltreatment on mental health, the effect of maltreatment on development, child abuse and safeguarding, top tips for teachers, recognising sexual abuse, schools and safeguarding duties, spotting the signs of child maltreatment, and what schools can do.

Download

What to do if you’re Worried a Child is being Abused

This publication by the Government gives advice and guidance on how to stop abuse within young people and what to do should concerns arise. It explains in detail the warning signs to look out for and the process that should be followed if you suspect a child is being neglected or abused.

Young Person Safety Plan

This resource is a must have for young people who might be experiencing situations of violence and unrest in their home. This safety plan is to be completed by a young person who may be experiencing abuse, or even after the abuse has stopped. Once completed, the safety plan should be kept in a safe place.

Recovering from Childhood Abuse

This book is written by abuse survivors for all survivors who experienced any form
of abuse or neglect in childhood and for those who provide support. Survivors of any abuse in childhood have the right, and often express their need, to be heard, and for
their experiences to be acknowledged, however long ago the abuse may have happened. NAPAC is an organisation that provides for this, and offers other support and information.

Online course

Child Protection: An Introduction – Online Course

This 3 hour course covers the basics of children’s welfare and how to approach situations where you believe a child may be in a dangerous situation. The topics covered in this course include how to recognise possible child abuse, how to respond appropriately, how to report concerns about a child and how to record what you have seen in reference to a child’s welfare.

Child Protection in Schools – Online Course

This short course takes about three hours to complete and covers topics such as how to recognise possible abuse, how to respond appropriately, how to report any concerns about a young person and how to record your observations. Following each section, there is five short questions to test whether you understood the information. Upon completion of the course, each participants gets a personalised certificate to confirm that they completed the course.

Physical Abuse e-Learning

Physical abuse can have a long-lasting and damaging effect on an individual, but children are very rarely abuse by strangers. In fact, abusers are more likely to be someone who comes into close, regular contact. Abusers can be teachers, next-door neighbours or a member of the family and this can make it harder for children to want to disclose.

Video

Victim Blaming Language

This video showcases real language that professionals have used when talking to victims of child sexual abuse and exploitation. The video highlights that the language used matters when talking to young people who experience these situations. Young people should not be blamed for their experiences, the only person than should be blamed is the perpetrators.

Love and Abuse

This is a free to access resource, created by Jory Kusy, available through YouTube. Everything seemed fine between Olivia and John. Just two teens, boyfriend and girlfriend, but when John begins to become jealous of Olivia’s male friend and study partner, Andrew, things between John and Olivia become physical. John and Olivia share their stories and tell what took place between the two.

Building a Picture of Abuse

After enduring years of abuse at home, one young girl is helping teachers better spot the signs of abuse in others. Abuse can happen to any child, regardless of their background, ethnicity or social class. It is important that teachers pick up on signs of abuse to help put a stop to something that might be happening.

Organisation

The Haven

(Featured resource)The Haven Wolverhampton supports women and their dependent children who are vulnerable to domestic violence, homelessness and abuse. They offer refuge accommodation, financial support, visual evidence for victims and training for professionals. It gives an opportunity for women to cry and express themselves without prejudice.

The National Association for People Abused in Childhood

NAPAC (the National Association for People Abused in Childhood) offers support to adult survivors of all types of childhood abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional abuse or neglect. A freephone helpline is available and the support team can also be contacted by email. Training courses are provided for professionals who support adult survivors of child abuse.

Webpage

Abuse

Everyone has the right to feel happy and safe, wherever they are and whoever they are with. However, sometimes people can be hurt by others, leaving them feeling unsafe. If an individual is being hurt by someone, this is called abuse.

This page from the Black Country CAMHS site provides an introduction to abuse, including physical, sexual and emotional abuse. It includes tips to support young people, and a set of additional links.

Child Maltreatment

Child maltreatment is any action causing potentially significant harm to a child. Maltreatment can be initiated by an adult or a child. It can involve physical, sexual, verbal or emotional abuse; neglect or exploitation. This webpage from Mentally Healthy Schools covers the impact of maltreatment on mental health, the effect of maltreatment on development, child abuse and safeguarding, top tips for teachers, recognising sexual abuse, schools and safeguarding duties, spotting the signs of child maltreatment, and what schools can do.

Download

What to do if you’re Worried a Child is being Abused

This publication by the Government gives advice and guidance on how to stop abuse within young people and what to do should concerns arise. It explains in detail the warning signs to look out for and the process that should be followed if you suspect a child is being neglected or abused.

Young Person Safety Plan

This resource is a must have for young people who might be experiencing situations of violence and unrest in their home. This safety plan is to be completed by a young person who may be experiencing abuse, or even after the abuse has stopped. Once completed, the safety plan should be kept in a safe place.

Recovering from Childhood Abuse

This book is written by abuse survivors for all survivors who experienced any form
of abuse or neglect in childhood and for those who provide support. Survivors of any abuse in childhood have the right, and often express their need, to be heard, and for
their experiences to be acknowledged, however long ago the abuse may have happened. NAPAC is an organisation that provides for this, and offers other support and information.

App / online service

The Contextual Safeguarding Audit Toolkit

The Contextual Safeguarding Audit Toolkit supports practitioners to recognise how social environments and extra-familial relationships are relevant to safeguarding adolescents and the extent to which local responses are already contextual in nature. The audit toolkit is divided into five sections; introduction, getting started, collecting evidence, dissemination and application.

Online course

Child Protection: An Introduction – Online Course

This 3 hour course covers the basics of children’s welfare and how to approach situations where you believe a child may be in a dangerous situation. The topics covered in this course include how to recognise possible child abuse, how to respond appropriately, how to report concerns about a child and how to record what you have seen in reference to a child’s welfare.

Child Protection in Schools – Online Course

This short course takes about three hours to complete and covers topics such as how to recognise possible abuse, how to respond appropriately, how to report any concerns about a young person and how to record your observations. Following each section, there is five short questions to test whether you understood the information. Upon completion of the course, each participants gets a personalised certificate to confirm that they completed the course.

Physical Abuse e-Learning

Physical abuse can have a long-lasting and damaging effect on an individual, but children are very rarely abuse by strangers. In fact, abusers are more likely to be someone who comes into close, regular contact. Abusers can be teachers, next-door neighbours or a member of the family and this can make it harder for children to want to disclose.