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Here are the resources we found for abuse for parents and families:

Organisation

The Haven

(Featured resource)The Haven Wolverhampton supports women and their dependent children who are vulnerable to domestic violence, homelessness and abuse. They offer refuge accommodation, financial support, visual evidence for victims and training for professionals. It gives an opportunity for women to cry and express themselves without prejudice.

The National Association for People Abused in Childhood

NAPAC (the National Association for People Abused in Childhood) offers support to adult survivors of all types of childhood abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional abuse or neglect. A freephone helpline is available and the support team can also be contacted by email. Training courses are provided for professionals who support adult survivors of child abuse.

Video

NSPCC Underwear Rule – Keeping Deaf Children Children Safe from Abuse

This video is made for parents and young people who are deaf or hard of hearing to show how to keep deaf children safe from child sexual exploitation and abuse. This video shows the story of a young man who’s deaf and his hearing mother, and a young girl and her dad who are both deaf and how they navigate teaching their children about how to stay safe from abuse.

How do Abusers do what They do?

Abusers operate by getting close to both children and adults – this is what we call the grooming process. This short webpage contains information about how people abuse children, and how they can convince young children to keep abuse a secret.

Preventing Abuse – How to Minimise the Risks

A safe relationship between adults and children is one in which secrets are hard to keep – one in which children would feel able to tell someone about abuse, even if they hadn’t been able to say ‘no’.  This Parent Info article equips parents with their top six tips to help minimise the risks of your child being abused.

MindEd for Families

MindEd for Families provides tonnes of resources on how to deal with young people in a variety of situations. The variety of situations included on this webpage is vast and covers topics like death and loss, medication, talking to your child, parenting a child with issues, sexual orientation and gender, eating disorders and what to do if your child refuses to go to school. If you need help and advice as a parent, this is the first place to go.

Abuse

Everyone has the right to feel happy and safe, wherever they are and whoever they are with. However, sometimes people can be hurt by others, leaving them feeling unsafe. If an individual is being hurt by someone, this is called abuse.

This page from the Black Country CAMHS site provides an introduction to abuse, including physical, sexual and emotional abuse. It includes tips to support young people, and a set of additional links.

Download

Recovering from Childhood Abuse

This book is written by abuse survivors for all survivors who experienced any form
of abuse or neglect in childhood and for those who provide support. Survivors of any abuse in childhood have the right, and often express their need, to be heard, and for
their experiences to be acknowledged, however long ago the abuse may have happened. NAPAC is an organisation that provides for this, and offers other support and information.

Organisation

The Haven

(Featured resource)The Haven Wolverhampton supports women and their dependent children who are vulnerable to domestic violence, homelessness and abuse. They offer refuge accommodation, financial support, visual evidence for victims and training for professionals. It gives an opportunity for women to cry and express themselves without prejudice.

The National Association for People Abused in Childhood

NAPAC (the National Association for People Abused in Childhood) offers support to adult survivors of all types of childhood abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional abuse or neglect. A freephone helpline is available and the support team can also be contacted by email. Training courses are provided for professionals who support adult survivors of child abuse.

How do Abusers do what They do?

Abusers operate by getting close to both children and adults – this is what we call the grooming process. This short webpage contains information about how people abuse children, and how they can convince young children to keep abuse a secret.

Preventing Abuse – How to Minimise the Risks

A safe relationship between adults and children is one in which secrets are hard to keep – one in which children would feel able to tell someone about abuse, even if they hadn’t been able to say ‘no’.  This Parent Info article equips parents with their top six tips to help minimise the risks of your child being abused.

MindEd for Families

MindEd for Families provides tonnes of resources on how to deal with young people in a variety of situations. The variety of situations included on this webpage is vast and covers topics like death and loss, medication, talking to your child, parenting a child with issues, sexual orientation and gender, eating disorders and what to do if your child refuses to go to school. If you need help and advice as a parent, this is the first place to go.

Download

Recovering from Childhood Abuse

This book is written by abuse survivors for all survivors who experienced any form
of abuse or neglect in childhood and for those who provide support. Survivors of any abuse in childhood have the right, and often express their need, to be heard, and for
their experiences to be acknowledged, however long ago the abuse may have happened. NAPAC is an organisation that provides for this, and offers other support and information.

Video

NSPCC Underwear Rule – Keeping Deaf Children Children Safe from Abuse

This video is made for parents and young people who are deaf or hard of hearing to show how to keep deaf children safe from child sexual exploitation and abuse. This video shows the story of a young man who’s deaf and his hearing mother, and a young girl and her dad who are both deaf and how they navigate teaching their children about how to stay safe from abuse.

Organisation

The Haven

(Featured resource)The Haven Wolverhampton supports women and their dependent children who are vulnerable to domestic violence, homelessness and abuse. They offer refuge accommodation, financial support, visual evidence for victims and training for professionals. It gives an opportunity for women to cry and express themselves without prejudice.

The National Association for People Abused in Childhood

NAPAC (the National Association for People Abused in Childhood) offers support to adult survivors of all types of childhood abuse, including physical, sexual, emotional abuse or neglect. A freephone helpline is available and the support team can also be contacted by email. Training courses are provided for professionals who support adult survivors of child abuse.

How do Abusers do what They do?

Abusers operate by getting close to both children and adults – this is what we call the grooming process. This short webpage contains information about how people abuse children, and how they can convince young children to keep abuse a secret.

Preventing Abuse – How to Minimise the Risks

A safe relationship between adults and children is one in which secrets are hard to keep – one in which children would feel able to tell someone about abuse, even if they hadn’t been able to say ‘no’.  This Parent Info article equips parents with their top six tips to help minimise the risks of your child being abused.

MindEd for Families

MindEd for Families provides tonnes of resources on how to deal with young people in a variety of situations. The variety of situations included on this webpage is vast and covers topics like death and loss, medication, talking to your child, parenting a child with issues, sexual orientation and gender, eating disorders and what to do if your child refuses to go to school. If you need help and advice as a parent, this is the first place to go.

Download

Recovering from Childhood Abuse

This book is written by abuse survivors for all survivors who experienced any form
of abuse or neglect in childhood and for those who provide support. Survivors of any abuse in childhood have the right, and often express their need, to be heard, and for
their experiences to be acknowledged, however long ago the abuse may have happened. NAPAC is an organisation that provides for this, and offers other support and information.